Modern architecture and exterior design

07/31/2018

 Modern architecture and exterior design

Contemporary architecture and facades are growing in popularity across the country. Clean lines and simple designs are among those attributes most commonly requested by homebuyers and homeowners for both the interior and exterior of the home.

In the design of the house, there is a special emphasis on the thermocoating, as it can serve as both an excellent way to improve curb appeal and create interesting focal points inside too by thermowood materials.

1. Modern Momentum

We know that vertical cladding is a great option for contemporary homes and now we will pose the question; why stop at the walls? This home chose to extend the modifiedthermowood cladding onto the roof, which is definitely a modern design choice, but it clearly paid off as this property is simply stunning.

2. Reaching New Heights

Traditionally, when homes were clad in thermowood, Roof garden the boards were run horizontally; and while it's still possible to achieve a modern facade this way, running the boards vertically is a hot new trend for the exterior of contemporary homes. Installed this way, the lines draw the eye upward, emphasizing the shape and height of the home, rather than elongating it. As we see in this home, the vertical cladding in combination with the angled roof make the home appear taller and more grand with a charming industrial feel..

3. Transitional Design

This home is a great example of how horizontally run cladding, typically a more traditional look, can actually be made moder when done right. The key is to keep the rest of the exterior very plain - with very few decorative elements - and to let the cladding emphasize the shape of the building. This home runs the cladding the entire length of the home and keeps the look clean and simple with paneless glass windows and no moulding or trim board detailing.

4. Open Front

Many contemporary homes include a lot of windows and skylights to help let in as much natural light as possible. These beach houses not only include those features, but by pairing the cladding on the walls with the same material on the roof, it creates the opportunity to have the front of the houses completely open. This not only allows for great views of the beach, but also maximizes the amount of sunlight let into the home

5. Mixed Materials

Horizontal lap cladding installation helps to elongate the home, but for properties that are only one story, this can also make it appear shorter as well. In this application, the cladding has been paired with other materials, lifting thewoodup a few feet from the bottom of the home before it begins., helping to create visual height. You'll again that no moulding or trim board was used here and that the materials used along the bottom of the home are very simple and muted, all of which help keep the facade contemporary.

6. Two-Tone

This contemporary home makes great use of wood cladding over its exterior by mixing the installation styles. You'll notice that while some of the boards are installed horizontally, on other parts of the exterior this changes to a vertical installation. This is a great way to show contrast between different sections of the home. This property also keeps it interesting by a strip of darker cladding along the top, adding even more variation and allure to the home's appeal.

7. Depth of Design

Many people think that cladding must be installed in one of a few set ways, however, when talking contemporary design this doesn't have to be the case. This property uses modified wood to create interest and depth on the exterior by finding many different uses for the same material. Using thethermowood for cladding, decking, ceiling and privacy screening gives this property an incredibly fresh and current appearance..

8. Detailed Emphasis

The plate glass windows are clearly the focal point of this modernhome, so it was important that all other components of the exterior facade complement and draw attention to their brilliance and clarity. By using natural wood cladding, the home is given a subtle and clean color palette that brightens the appearance. The vertical accent panels set between the windows contrast the horizontal, natural tone cladding and further emphasize the picture windows.

9. Two Dimensional

This home underwent a major renovation to become the stunning passive house it is today. In creative pursuit to add dimension while using the same sustainablemodified wood, the installation varies from vertical to horizontal orientations. Taking the multi-purpose use one step further, they used the cladding to create a railing / privacy screen on the second floor balcony by subtly increasing the spacing between the boards

10. Accented Frame

This remodeled farmhouse uses the same beautiful cladding on its exterior walls , roof and deck to create clean, unbroken lines. This in turn frees up the front of the property to feature an open, glass front to maximize the light. The long solid lines of the cladding boards provide simple consistency to the varied shapes and sizes of the window panes.

11. Historic Modernization

The owners of this historic stone estate wanted to modernize the look of their home without detracting from its classic charm. By using realwoodcladding on the exterior facade, they created a notable juxtaposition between the wood and pre-existing natural stone that resulted in the graceful transition from old to new.

12. Board and Batten

Long, sprawling properties that are contemporary in design can benefit from having a vertical cladding installation to add some contrast to the exterior. On this property, a striking board and batten installation adds texture and depth to the facade, while contrasting the horizontal lines of the building. The larger, thicker battens create a modern twist on this classic siding design.

13. Deep Angles

Who says that houses need to be straight up and down? This mountain cabin broke the mold, creating an innovative design where the building moves upward at an angle after the first floor foundation. With such a unique architectural angle, it was important that the lines of the cladding quietly complemented the lines of the home. By choosing modified wood cladding they were able to achieve the natural beauty they wanted while ensuring it would hold up given the severe weather conditions of the location.


Thermo Timber Wall Scaffolding

Wood siding enhances any home no matter what style of property it's installed on. For many people, the look and feel of real wood is truly what makes a house a home. For that reason, in addition to improved durability with technological advancements like modified wood siding, it's very common to find homes clad in natural wood siding. These 47 wood siding ideas are meant to help you get a better understanding of what may be possible for your own home.

2. Playful Directions

This kindergarten takes a more playful approach to its façade by installing the siding in different directions. Proving the simple doesn't have to be boring.

3. Siding Accents

There's no rule that states you have to use the same material for the entire exterior of your property; so why not mix it up?. This hotel uses realwood siding as an accent against the glass, metal and concrete, which helps to break up the creating a warmer, more approachable building.

  • Riveting Installation

This property mixes rustic with modern through the exposed nails along the face of the natural wood siding. The result complements the sleek, contemporary feel of the building, while lending more interest and dimension to the siding.

  • Depth Through Nature

One of the best things about natural wood siding is the natural color variation and multi-tonal color palette. Even though this home is uniformly clad in wood siding, there is still variety and depth in the different hues.

  • Rustic Cabin Siding

Rustic modern homes are extremely popular just about everywhere. They combine the sleek lines of contemporary buildings with the rustic appeal of timber siding. This cabin makes great use of real wood siding, left in its natural state to complement the style.

  • Weathered to Perfection

Too many homes are meticulously painted and decorated in a way that doesn't complement their surroundings and make maintenance and upkeep a chore. For rustic appeal, however, sometimes a weathered exterior is the better choice. This home has been allowed to age naturally, which lets it blend in with its environment and doesn't require maintenance.

  • Thin Planks

You may not be aware, but natural wood siding comes in a range of different widths. This school used a thinner plank both to add more depth and interest to its exterior walls.

  • Bold Colors

One of the nicest features of wood siding is that it provides an elegant, neutral color palette that can complement virtually any color scheme. These children's shelters for example, introduce bold, vibrant colors that really pop when set against the natural wood siding.

  • The Look of Board and Batten

When you want something a little different than traditional lap siding, consider the beauty of board and batten. This rustic boat house extends the same board and batten siding right up onto the roof to create a seamless exterior that stands out from its surroundings.

  • Unifying Levels

Homes with multiple levels can often struggle to find the right balance between diversification and unification. This property used modified wood cladding to bring together the different levels and components of the home, while mixing in other materials, like stone and concrete, to create areas of transition from one level to the next.

  • Beauty from Within

Although wood siding is often installed to create a solid façade, it doesn't have to be. This building spaced the natural wood planks far enough apart so that light would flood out beyond the translucent glass shell at night. The result being a stunningly beautiful landmark for this seaside city.

  • Wood Wrapping

Natural wood siding can be used for more than just the walls of a home or building. This hotel wrapped entire sections in timber siding, using it on all exterior surfaces of the particular segments. Mixing this contemporary installation style throughout the exterior of the building, along with other contrasting building materials, creates a striking and modern facade.

  • Elevated Siding

Adding the illusion of height to a one-story home can be a challenge. If you fall in this category, try starting your wood cladding a few feet off the ground, adding a contrasting material along the base. The result is a heightened appearance for the entire .

  • Irregular Edges

For unconventional projects, like this bath house, consider creating an unconventional exterior to match. The ends of the wood boards aren't cut match, creating a more organic appearance the matches both the curvature of the structure as well as the environment it's built in.

  • Wood Screening

The exterior of this building has an industrial, modern feel achieved by combining wood siding with metal rails. In a very unique installation, we can see that instead of a solid surface, the cladding was used to create an elaborate screening display.

  • Multi-Dimensional

Can't decide which siding application is best for your building? Consider blending two like this school did. Vertical battens installed over shiplap siding give this exterior a lot of dimension and depth.

  • Inspired by Nature

The owner of this stunning residence wanted to their home to highlight the beauty of nature. With large picture windows they were given an uninterrupted view of their property's grounds. And their respect for nature was further demonstrated by the use of sustainable, modified wood cladding that helped to ground the airy design.

  • Blending boundaries

The oversized roof blends the barrier between roofing and walls. Entirely clad in modified wood siding the flow of this restaurant is seamless around the entire building.

  • Depth of Design

This home was given a big splash of dimension during its remodel with a varied use of wood cladding. The cladding on the main part of the house is run vertically, while on the front portion it changes to a horizontal installation, further emphasizing the space.

  • Contemporary Angles

For buildings like this beach shelter, emphasizing the angles and lines helps to create style from simplicity. Using the same natural wood siding flowing in different directions over the interior and exterior helps finish the flow of the creative design.

  • Integral Possibilities

This remodeled farmhouse uses natural wood siding to cover both its walls and its roof. The clean lines of the wood moving up and over the home create a frame for the open, glass-front design that completes its transitional style.

  • Sleek Style

What is typically a more rustic product, wood, becomes sleek in its appearance in this modern home's design. Using simple shapes, straight lines and beautiful wood cladding to achieve a polished, contemporary look.

  • Organic Mod

Many contemporary buildings utilize harsh materials such as concrete or metal to achieve their modern look, however not this property. These student housing buildings used real wood siding in a vertical installation to add character to the mod design. The result helps the buildings fit in with their more organic surrounding.

  • Sculptural Style

One of the best things about real wood siding is its ability to be used in so many different ways. This building utilizes wood in a unique way to provide a sculptural and dimensional covering that lets the light through in a way that emphasizes the shapes it creates.

  • Slanted Style

This mountain cabin is brought to life through the unique movement it appears to have with its sloping construction. To facilitate this design, while allowing it to keep its natural appearance, timber wood siding was used, atop the stone base, following the different planes and angles of the cabin.

  • Heightened Appeal

Creating grandeur through larger than life heights is made easy with vertically installed wood siding. This home is a prime example of what can be achieved when mixing thermowood price with modern design.

  • In the Round

Covering a circular home may seem challenging with traditional lap siding, but the same wood material can be used with ease, if installed in a vertical application. This round house features natural wood siding installed vertically on both layers to help it achieve fluid movement around its unique shape.

  • Simplicity of Design

Many homes use siding in a variety of ways to emphasize the architecture. Most of these methods though involve using decorative elements and changes of color as well. This tourist cabin achieves the same goals, but with only one type of wood siding and color throughout.

  • Dimensional Style

While tightly fitted or overlapping siding is what's normally expected on an exterior, sometimes leaving some space can help you achieve more interesting results. This home is clad with wood siding that has been left slightly open, giving it more depth and dimension than it would have otherwise.

  • Tree House of Dreams

There's something about a tree house that sets the imagination free, no matter what age you are. This park features numerous tree houses, all designed of the same sustainable wood siding, making them appear as though they've grown there naturally.

  • Cage of Curves

This quiet treehouse is not only clad in natural wood siding, it's surrounded by a protective cage built of the same wood as well. This gives substance and a sculptural feel to the home, turning it into a work of art.

  • Irregular Shape

When choosing the right materials for a building with an irregular shape, it's smart to choose something that will provide balance and stability. The wood siding used on this unique building draws clean lines that help ground the topsy-turvy design.

  • Artistically Enhanced

A house's exterior should not only reflect its surroundings, but its occupants as well. This artist's retreat does just that, combining the clean lines of sustainable wood siding with a mixture of overlapping diamonds made from the same material. The result being a very natural and artistic design.

  • Open to the Air

Positioned right on the water, this marina opens right up to the views that sit just outside. Natural wood siding creates the illusion that the building is opening from within, almost as though it wants to embrace the outdoors.

  • Sustainable Future

This sustainable school needed to be clad in something that would reflect its goals. Modified wood siding achieved just that, creating a building that is as organic looking as it is sustainable in practice.

  • Creating Height

This one-story, circular building gains both the illusion of height, as well as dimension through its natural wood siding. A board and batten application adds depth to various parts, while the vertical board placement draws the eye upward.

  • Energetic Placement

Wanting to make a statement that was as powerful as the energy it produces, this power plant uses sustainable wood siding installed at a series of angles. The idea was to have the design tell the story of its location, surrounded by forests and mountains.

  • Mixing Materials

Sometimes wood siding works best when it's paired with another natural material, like fieldstone. This building uses a combination of wood siding and fieldstone, creating contrast and attitude.

  • Dynamic Design

The vertical installation of this chapel's wood siding, draws the eye upward in a elegant and graceful manner. The layered boards uniquely spaced over the facade adds novel definition with a uniform, tailored look.

  • In and Out Design

In nice weather, this beach club extends, pulling outward from a wood-sided hull to give access to a glass enclosed patio. The vertically placed siding extends up and over the roof as well, creating a unique building experience.

  • Uniform Inconsistency

Some designs, like this student housing development, play with inconsistency. The windows of these buildings seem haphazardly placed, being out of line with one another, yet the vertical wood siding somehow adds uniformity to the chaos.

  • Rainscreen Siding

Wood siding can serve more function than just looking nice. This home needed a siding that could also act as a rainscreen, which they found in this beautiful modified wood siding. Completing the renovation of a historic home with style, charm and purpose.

  • Standing Out

This row of houses sets itself apart from those on either side by contrasting the brick homes with a series done in natural wood siding. The wood siding creates a softer feel, while shining a spotlight on the beautiful success of this bold renovation.

  • Open and Shut Design

The sliding doors of this artist's home are covered in the same wood siding as the rest of the exterior. When closed, the building seems solid and complete, however when opened, large picture windows are exposed letting in light and leaving the look of the exterior walls uninterrupted.

  • Playful Panels

Natural wood siding is beautiful, but not always the most exciting material in color. This Waldorf school solves that with inset colorful panels surrounding the windows.

  • Clad from Above

This summer cabin is ideally placed near an ocean with plenty of beautiful views. It complements its surroundings by being clad in the same wood siding on both the walls and the roof. The roof continues to weather gracefully, as modified wood does, to a lovely silvery gray.

  • Tightly Shiplapped

Shiplap wood siding is incredibly popular for rustic-style homes. This building features a very narrow plank, which helps to add more dimension and interest to the exterior.

Natural wood siding comes in a range of styles, widths, finishes and installations. Get creative with your home or building to cover it in style with wood siding.

thermowood

Increase the value of the house with wooden flooring

A beautiful outdoor space is one of the most important assets for every home. A great deck can increase the value of your home far more than the initial investment cost.

A quality deck is maintenance-free and built to last a lifetime.A quality deck looks good and feels nice to walk on barefoot.A quality deck increases the value of your home - both short and long term.Wood presents multiple benefits to the construction industry. First, forests are natural "carbon sinks," that absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. Second, wood harvesting provides great environmental returns to their environment including the promotion of sustainable forest management, a decreased risk of forest fires, and increased forest biomass.

There are many decking materials that look good in the store, however once you get them home and installed, issues resulting from twisting, splinters and sap can often occur. Or perhaps you find it simply doesn't look as good as you'd hoped. All of these issues can be costly to repair and additionally to maintain, adding greatly to the overall cost of your deck.

building materials and practices is also profitable for builders. From a logistical standpoint it is more profitable for builders to use sustainably sourced woods than tropical hardwoods. For example, popular hardwood Ipe takes 80-100 years to mature compared to sustainable alternatives like Kebony, a modified pine that matures in just 30 years and takes 3 days to modify.

The environmental benefits, profitability and accelerated supply chain associated with wood are all forces leading today's construction industry to bring wood to the forefront of building and design.